The modern successor of the Milus Super compressor

Archimèdes by Milus is the modern successor of the Milus Super compressor of the seventies. In the mid-to-late 50s, Swiss case manufacturer Ervin Piquerez S.A. (EPSA) filed patents and began manufacturing their latest and greatest catalog component, the Super Compressor case, for brands such as JLC, Longines, Blancpain and Milus.

During the 70s, it was extremely common for brands to use catalog components from general case manufactures such as EPSA. As a result, many of the vintage Super Compressor that have survived through the years share common and identifiable components.

Original Archimèdes model, 1970

The modern-day Archimèdes by Milus

To create a stunningly contemporary watch, the model’s reinvention was subsequently a question of research and proportions.

The development focused on the 41mm brushed casing and the reflection of the mirror-polished bezel.

The granulated black or blue dial  with famous “Broad Arrow” hands coated in SuperLuminova combine seamlessly to bolster readability.  The hour markers comprise of batons, triangular indexes and Arabic numerals.

The internal rotating bezel, used to keep track of the time spent underwater, is bidirectional and operated using the upper crown at 2 o’clock.  As per the hour markers, the bezel employs batons, Arabic numerals at the cardinal points and a prominent triangular index at noon.

The Archimèdes of the 1960s was fitted with Plexiglass, the modern-day Milus Archimèdes features a curved sapphire glass ( owners will appreciate the toughness of sapphire crystal). 

Its ETA 2892 movement is protected in a steel case equipped with a helium valve, resistant up to 30 ATM or 300 metres.

Helium is among the smallest natural gas particles found in nature. Under the right circumstances (like high pressure), helium molecules can slowly penetrate the watch case through the gaskets. When the diver begins his ascent to the surface, this built up can lead to the sapphire crystal popping off.
To address this issue, the helium valve automatically depressurizes the watch when it returns to a sea level pressure environment. The one-way valve lets pressure out of the watch and allows the helium trapped in the watch to be released during decompression. It’s designed to never allow water with its larger molecule to pass into the watch.

The Archimèdes by Milus is an object of timeless design, adapted for land or sea, and carries the promise of elegance and masculinity upon its wearer.

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